After months of waiting for Marvel & Netflix to release anything regarding Jessica Jones, we’re now less than two weeks away from the launch of the series on the streaming service. In Entertainment Weekly’s latest issue, there’s a full page article on Jessica Jones, including a few quotes from showrunner Melissa Rosenberg and star Krysten Ritter, along with a couple of new behind the scenes images, including one that showcases David Tennant‘s Kilgrave.



Since they are following in the footsteps of Daredevil, there will be similarities and differences. One of the similarities between the two leads is how they are not perfect heroes, or even people for that matter. That is something that Rosenberg wanted to focus on throughout the series.

“We meant to explore the outer reaches of this character and take her on a profound emotional journey. Keeping Jessica flawed and damaged was our focus. That, by necessity, means going to some dark places.”

Having heroes like Daredevil and Jessica Jones, who operate in the dark, give viewers a closer connection to the characters and makes them easier to identify with. As we move further into the Netflix series, we should all hope that Marvel and Netflix continue to create morally complex characters that can generate rich stories. Making the heroes flawed is no accident either according to Head of Marvel Televison Jeph Loeb,

“Each one of our heroes starts at a very understandable place place for the audience. The stories we tell work best when people can identify with our heroes.”

Comic Book Resources was also able to get an interview with a few of the supporting cast members to discuss their characters and what we can expect to see from Netflix’s second Marvel series.

On how their characters fit into the story of “Jessica Jones”:

Traval: My character in the show is Officer Simpson. He’s a good cop, everything’s black and white, justice can be served easily. He understands whose good and who’s bad and that kind of works in opposition to the way Jessica Jones works ’cause she deals in a world of gray. She has differing opinions on how justice should be served or executed. So that causes us to have friction between the two of us, we don’t work alongside one another so well [Laughs]. Interestingly enough, this character doesn’t appear in the “Alias” comics — he appears in the Marvel Comics Universe, just in a different series — he is a reinvention, I guess?

Darville: Yeah. It’s inspired by other characters.

Traval: Inspired. There’s a germ character out there but he was a little bit too hard to handle [Laughter] he was just a psychotic crazy guy. They reshaped the character for the Marvel Television series, and I think to the benefit of the character and the benefit of Marvel themselves. Now they have another character to throw into the mix.

Moriarty: My character, Hope, is kind of an average — she goes to NYU, she’s a student there, she’s an athlete. But she gets involved in Jessica Jones’ world because someone previously in Jessica Jones’ life who had a really negative impact on her life enters my life and her first P.I. case involves my character and as a result leads to the reemergence of this kind of dark person from Jessica’s past, which is Kilgrave, yeah. So Kilgrave comes back into Jessica Jones’ life through my character in a very tactical way.

Darville: I’ve got a kind of similar story to Wil here where it’s inspired by characters, seed characters within the comics, but they’ve taken it in a different direction. He’s a new creation and the way that he interacts with Jessica’s story is — it’s really hard to talk about it because if I give away anything in it it will really kind of spoil this amazing arc that he goes through. But I can say he starts one place and ends somewhere very differently. And the drug addiction stuff was pretty intense and dark to play and going there every day was a lot of work to kind of take myself to that place on a daily basis and live in that world. It was an experience, and his relationship with Jessica is like a flip-flop between victim and savior, and that’s kind of their relationship, it’s much more siblingly [sic] than anything else.

Having heroes like Daredevil and Jessica Jones, who operate in the dark, give viewers a closer connection to the characters and makes them easier to identify with. As we move further into the Netflix series, we should all hope that Marvel and Netflix continue to create morally complex characters that can generate rich stories.

Sources: CBR & Entertainment Weekly.